Beauty School Directory Blog

How to Write a Cosmetology Resume

Posted on: April 2nd, 2012 by Beauty Schools Directory 5 Comments

Mi Lintee - Beauty Job Center

Mi-lintee is the owner of The Beauty Job Center. She is a Freelance Career Advisor and motivational speaker with over 10 years experience in Career Development. Her passion is motivating students and professionals to reaching their career aspirations. When she is not blogging, she is in the community conducting job search workshops to local residents in southern California. If you would like to contact her, follow Beauty Job Center on Twitter or visit TheBeautyJobCenter.com

Is your resume for the beauty industry attractive? If not, when was the last time you revised it? One of the key factors to becoming employed in any industry is having an attractive resume. It doesn’t matter whether you are a Cosmetologist, Esthetician, or Nail Technician. The rules applies to everyone. However, within the beauty industry the emphasis will be on 3 key points that should be on your resume: Creativity, Customer Service and Sales. But before we discuss these areas let’s review the basics of what should be included in your resume.

Basic Information: The first step to remember when composing your beauty job resume is to include your full legal name, not a nickname. Some individuals will use a first initial and last name or
How to Write a Resume for a Beauty Job
other aliases. Employers must have your true identity on all documentation. Also, when submitting your resume in mass quantities, especially via the Internet, list the city and state where you reside as opposed to your full address. Identity theft is on the rise, it is quite acceptable to either use a post office box address or just list the city and state where you reside. You are simply protecting yourself. In addition, is important to list an actual working phone number in your contact header. There is nothing more frustrating (or embarrassing!) then an employer calling a potential candidate and the phone number is either disconnected or not in service. Another tip, please refrain from using voice messages that contain music which is loud or has inappropriate lyrics. I am sure you are all familiar with the kind of music that discuss shaking body parts or getting drunk all night. Music like this is fine during your personal time. However, employers may find this offensive. Email addresses, a common mistake I have seen in many resumes are inappropriate email addresses such as ILovePatronSilver@emailaddress.com or BigDaddy1993@emailaddress.com. When in doubt, use a professional email address such as your full name or business name. It is very difficult for an employer to consider a candidate seriously for employment with an address such as the above. The same applies for a website or social media profile. A word to the wise, use your social media profile with caution. If you have pictures of yourself drinking tequila shots with some friends, then you may want to think twice about posting this on Facebook or YouTube. Employers do view your profiles. Therefore, it is best to err on the side of caution when displaying your social media link on a resume. Remember, THINK PROFESSIONAL.

Now that we have covered the basics for contact information. Let’s review the sections that should also be present in your resume.

Career Summary: The career summary of your cosmetology resume includes a snapshot of who you are as a professional to the employer. The main difference between a Career Summary and an Objective is in the description and profile of you as the professional. Notice the difference between the two examples below.  Do you see the difference? Which one would you prefer on your resume?

  • Objective: Seeking a position as a Stylist in a salon.
  • Career Summary: Energetic and passionate cosmetologist with 2 years experience in the industry seeking a position as an Assistant Stylist in an upscale and reputable salon where I can enhance my skills.


Skills And Qualifications: This is the section of your beauty resume where you definitely want to shine. I call this the brag section. I see so many students and graduates leave this section out and short-change themselves.
Please don’t. Your skills are your assets, the things you do well. Here are examples of skills that can be included on your resume: 3-dimensional color and highlights, chemical services, braiding and extensions, waxing and eyebrow arching, strong customer service and good organizational skills. Don’t forget to include your knowledge of a second language if applicable. All of these are important skills to include in a resume for a beauty career. The more valuable skills you list, the more marketable you are to the employer.

Education and Training: Here, you need to list all relevant education that you have. List your most recent education first. If the last school you attended was, for example, one of these cosmetology schools, then list the beauty school first, followed by any other schools you attended. Furthermore, if you received special training at one-off courses for make-up or Keratin Hair Extensions, or some other special skill, you should include this as well.

Licenses and Certifications: This is another brag section, and sadly so many professionals do not give themselves credit in this section. Therefore, list all licenses and certifications you have acquired that are relevant to the beauty business. Again, list the most recent first.

Example:

  • Certified Eyelash Extension Specialist (2010)
  • Certified Make-up Artist (2006)

Professional Experience: Experience is key. When describing what tasks you’ve completed in previous employment. Your choice of words is very important. Be sure to use action words to describe tasks and highlight specifics. Instead of using, “I talk to clients daily in the salon,” try instead saying something like, “Communicate with clients daily about health of hair and scalp.” Describe highlights of previous employment by using 4 to 6 bullets for each company or business you worked for. Action words should be past tense if you no longer work for that company. Otherwise, if you are still employed then use present tense. Another common mistake some graduates make is not listing employment in reverse order. Always list the most current employer first.
Example:

  • Stylist, Star Beauty Salon, Long Beach, CA | 2011 to Present
  • Stylist, Escape Salon and Spa, Redondo Beach, CA | 2009 to 2010

Now, I know what some of you are thinking. You’re asking yourself, “What if I have never worked? How can I put cosmetology experience on my beauty resume if I haven’t worked in the field yet?” Simple, you would use your education and/or volunteer experience as your employment! Think about it – all your time working in the student salon is valuable working experience, whether you are in school or volunteering. So use this to your advantage. All experience counts. Which brings me to two points you need to add under experience – customer service and sales. Beauty professionals rely heavily on selling the right beauty products to clients to make a business successful. Remember, good customer service = client retention, and client retention = high sales. Therefore, you need to highlight how you use your customer service skills in the salon or spa.

Example:

  • Increased product sales by 10% in one month by promoting Working Mom’s Pamper Day Specials.
  • Demonstrated exceptional customer service by sending monthly birthday cards to clients.

Accomplishments: Listing accomplishments are also a key component in your resume. Employers are impressed by achievers. Some examples of what you might include in this section are awards received from hair
shows and competitions, or honors received from beauty school or a past cosmetology job.

References: You can add “Available Upon Request” to the bottom of your resume, or you can include a second sheet with your references listed on it. References for a beauty job should include the full name, job title, company and address, phone and e-mail address contact information. The most important aspect about this is that you list your references on a separate page and not in the resume itself.

 

So there you have it. I hope this tutorial on how to write a resume for a beauty job was helpful to you all. It takes practice to learn how to write a cosmetology resume. One more final tip always, review your resume many times and use spell check prior to submitting your resume to an employer. Ask some friends or colleagues to read your resume and offer feedback, and definitely read it out loud on your own to make sure it all reads correctly! Good luck! If you have any questions, please feel free to email me.

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5 Responses

  1. Carol brown says:

    Thank u VERY HELPFUL

  2. Debra says:

    Thank you so much for the resume writing insight. I was afraid to “brag”, as I have a lot of advanced training, and personal/sales/customer service and business skills. Now I feel comfortable after reading your article about writing my resume. ; )

  3. Shanta says:

    I recently graduated from beauty school & this definitely helped me out a lot bc I didn’t know where to begin :)

  4. Julie says:

    I have worked in a couple salons and booth rent but now I have been doing friends hair on the side. I am looking to get back in the business and I am trying to figure out my best options for a resume. Can you help?

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