The Bikini Waxing Debate: Sugaring vs. Waxing

WRITTEN BY: Elizabeth On 07/23/2009 • Skin

The Bikini Waxing Debate: Sugaring vs. Waxing

All of the horror stories in the media lately about the dangers of Brazilian waxing and bikini waxing got me wondering, what alternatives are there for men and women who want to go hairless? For those who are tired of shaving but can't commit to laser hair removal? There is another alternative that's been around much longer than waxing (supposedly ancient Egypt) but isn't as popular in salons and spas - sugaring.

And so it begins. The battle of the century. Which hair removal technique is better: sugaring or waxing?

Submitted by Elizabeth on Thu, 07/23/2009 - 12:12


Sugaring - Sugaring is similar to waxing as it rips hair straight from the root, but there are differences in the application. The sugaring paste or gel is applied lukewarm, under no circumstances should you accidently get burned during this procedure. Using a traditional sugaring technique, the sugaring paste or gel is removed the same direction as hair grows; this is easier on the skin and less painful. Sugaring also only attaches to dead skin cells - it won't accidently remove your skin.

Waxing - Wax is applied warm, there have been several cases of clients getting burned during this procedure. Wax strips are pulled off in the opposite direction of hair growth, which can be hard on the skin and painful. Wax attaches to both dead and live skin cells making the possibility of skin coming off more likely.


Sugaring - Sugaring has natural ingredients that are less harsh on the skin and are less likely to cause allergic reactions. The main ingredients in the sugaring formula are sugar, lemon juice and water; essential oils may be included as well.

Waxing - Waxes have many more ingredients and most are not natural. Waxes are usually made of resins and can include artificial fragrances, dyes, chemicals, and preservatives.


Sugaring - Bacteria does not breed or survive in sugar; it actually helps prevent infections and promotes healing. Sugaring is also water-soluble, extremely easy to clean up and leaves the skin feeling smooth.

Waxing - Bacteria breeds in wax, can bruise skin, and can cause rashes and bumps. Wax is difficult to clean up; usually heavy oils or chemicals are needed and it often leaves the client's skin sticky.


At most salons and spas, sugaring costs a few dollars more than waxing. The main reason for the price increase is that sugaring takes longer than waxing.


From most of the comparisons I've read, sugaring seems like the obvious choice. I think most of us would be willing to pay a few dollars more for less pain and risk of infection, as well as a better, more natural result.

So why isn't it available everywhere like waxing seems to be? I'm curious, is this technique is being taught in the majority of cosmetology schools? Does your salon or spa offer it? What are your experiences with sugaring and waxing?