May 28, 2020 Update

As of today, 41 states have authorized cosmetology schools to reopen with restrictions. We anticipate most other states will do the same in the next month or so. What does "with restrictions" mean? This will depend on your state, but may include any or all of the following:

  • Smaller class sizes: You might go to school every other day or only mornings or afternoons, alternating with other classmates.
  • Social distancing: Schools might require you to work at least one station apart or have barriers between stations.
  • Masks: You and your instructors might be required to wear masks.
  • Clinicals: These may be limited—advanced students who are ready to graduate will generally take priority.

If your school has a salon, there may be additional restrictions for working with clients:

  • Reduced number of clients: Salons may run at 50% capacity or less to make sure clients can social distance.
  • Before entry: Clients might have to wait in the car until called. They won't be able to bring in food, beverages, and possibly no phone or purse. They will have their temperature taken before entering the salon.
  • Limited services: Salons may not offer pedicures or manicures. They may ban blow-drying, which can spread infection.
  • Age limit: States may not allow clients above a certain age to receive services.
  • Time between appointments: You won't be able to double-book—you will only have one client at a time.

Note that just because your state allows schools to reopen, it doesn't mean your school will do so. Contact your school to find out the details about when they will reopen and what their restrictions will be.

 

April 23, 2020 Update

If you are currently attending cosmetology school or will be starting soon (before June 1), you may be concerned about how you will take classes during these uncertain times.

Fortunately, many state cosmetology boards have approved temporary distance learning programs for the schools in their state. These programs would allow you to complete a portion of your training from home—currently 10% or higher.

Distance learning and online learning are totally different things. Distance learning is a temporary emergency option to allow the currently enrolled students a chance to continue education. With online programs schools need to send in a curriculum and follow particular guidelines.

—Kim Burgett, former beauty school owner

What might these programs look like? Although they will vary by school, they might include getting email assignments, watching video lectures, or accessing materials and assignments online. The programs will only cover the theory part of your training.

If your school was already offering online courses, however, your life won't change. You can continue to take these classes as determined by your school.

As of April 23, 2020, the following 48 states have approved temporary distance learning for cosmetology schools:

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
 

Just as with the coronavirus itself, things can change quickly. State boards that have not approved distance learning today might approve it tomorrow. The number of credit hours might change, as well as the types of courses you can take. To help you keep abreast of any changes, Beauty Schools Directory will publish updates as new information becomes available.

Keep in mind that even if your state allows schools to implement distance learning programs, your school might not necessarily have the resources to do so. Make sure to check with your school to find out their policy.

If you are not a current cosmetology student but have been interested in going to beauty school, you may want to continue researching which school is best for you and requesting information. Many schools are still getting in contact with inquiring incoming students, even if their situation is evolving.

Submitted by angela on 03/26/2020 - 16:47